Communication

Assistant Professors: Donati, Peterson (Chairperson)

Part-time Instructors: Dougherty, Fausey, Van Auken

A major in communication with a liberal arts base is the perfect choice for students interested in digital video, digital filmmaking, video editing, film and video production and post-production, corporate communication, advertising, public relations, management, event planning, sales, marketing, and radio broadcasting.

The department offers majors in Corporate Communication and Digital Media Communication and minors in Digital Media Communication, Film Studies and Media Writing. Students balance theory and practice as they study the way media interacts with society and are introduced to a variety of media in their courses, extracurricular activities, independent projects, and internships.

The following courses, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the writing intensive requirement: ART 320, 327; CCOM 210, 324, 400; FILM 220, 315, 320, 326.

MAJORS

CORPORATE COMMUNICATION (CCOM)

Corporate Communication is an inter-disciplinary major designed to prepare students for a variety of careers in business, government, non-profit, political, policy, international or non-governmental organizations.

The program leads to professional opportunities in corporate communication, public relations, advertising, marketing communication, public affairs, advocacy, media relations, human resources, change management, investor relations, science and environmental communication, international communication, and related fields.

All students majoring in Corporate Communication must complete a total of 12 units, distributed as follows:

I.  Required Core Communication courses (five courses), plus colloquia:

     CCOM 200 – Introduction to Corporate Communication
     CCOM 210 – Writing for Corporate Communication
     CCOM 324 – Public Relations
     CCOM 332 – Advertising & Integrated Marketing Communication
     DCOM 100 – Introduction to Visual MediaCOMM 146, 246, 346, 446 – A total of four semesters of non-credit colloquium

II. Core business-related courses (three courses):

     ACCT 110 – Financial Accounting
     BUS 228 – Marketing Principles

     And one of either

     ECON 110 – Principles of Macroeconomics

     OR

     ECON 111 – Principles of Microeconomic

III. Communication capstone (one course):

      CCOM 400 – Corporate Communication Strategy
      CCOM 440 – Capstone Research Project

IV. Elective Courses (select three courses) Other related courses may be substituted with
     departmental approval: 

      ANTH 229 – Cultural Anthropology
      BUS 238 – Fundamentals of Financial Management
      BUS 244 – Management and Organizational Behavior
      BUS 313 – Sustainable Business Management
      BUS 333 – Global Business Strategies
      BUS 429 – Marketing Strategies
      CCOM 211 – Informative and Persuasive Speaking
      CCOM 330 -- Topics in Corporate Communication
      CCOM 333 – Financial Communication
      CCOM 400 – Corporate Communication Strategy
      CCOM 440 – Capstone Research Project
      CCOM 470 – Internship
      ECON 220 – Money and Banking
      MWTG 219 – Convergent Social Media
      MWTG 324 – Digital Publishing
      MWTG 325 -- Web Communication
      PHIL 216 – Business Ethics
      PSCI 220 – Public Policy in America
      PSCI 261 – International Organizations
      PSCI 228 – Environmental Law and Politics
      PSCI 316 – Public Opinion and Polling

200
INTRODUCTION TO CORPORATE COMMUNICATION
This course introduces: 1) The functional disciplines within corporate communication, including media relations, investor relations, employee relations and community relations, 2) Stakeholder management and issues management as core competencies of corporate communication, 3) The purposes and organization of a corporation, and 4) The relations among corporate and personal reputation, responsibility and ethics. Information and insights from this course are applicable equally to non-profit, for-profit or public sector organizations.

210
WRITING FOR CORPORATE COMMUNICATION
Instruction and practice in tactical writing skills, to attain the entry-level competence expected for professionals in public relations and corporate communication. These skill sets include messaging, document formats and document distribution, writing for aural, oral, digital and traditional communication, speech writing, writing news releases and media relations.  Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107 or permission of the instructor.

211
INFORMATIVE AND PERSUASIVE SPEAKING
Students train in methods of informative and persuasive speaking, including formal speeches, impromptu situations, presentations, and persuasion in critical situations. This course emphasizes the basic elements of effective public discourse: audience analysis, organization, content, and presentation skills.  Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107.

324
PUBLIC RELATIONS
This course considers the practice, theory, philosophy, ethics and history of public relations. It appraises the capacity of public relations 1) to inform, 2) to persuade, 3) to cause, maintain or change events and perceptions, and 4) to foster strategic business choices and decisions, through rhetorical means.  Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107.

330
TOPICS IN CORPORATE COMMUNICATION
Study of communication theory as applied to a special area of corporate communication through readings, discussion, and applications. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above, or CCOM 200, or permission of instructor.  May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

332
ADVERTISING & INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION
As an introduction to advertising and integrated marketing communication (IMC), this course links communication theory to practice fundamentals, such as branding, segmentation, targeting, message development, creative execution and media planning.  It details the growth of advertising into the broader field of IMC due to the dominance of brand, media fragmentation and increased customer empowerment, among other forces.

333
FINANCIAL COMMUNICATION
Financial communication combines its core discipline – communication -- with elements from corporate finance, law, accounting, information technology, management and marketing.  Its primary purpose is to sustain a company’s reputation, financial standing and optimum valuation.   This course covers the role of information in the capital markets, formal and informal disclosure of material information, relevant U.S securities law and regulations, corporate governance, and working with investors, potential investors, financial analysts and the financial media. This course requires no mathematics. Prerequisite: CCOM 200, or an ACCT, BUS or ECON course, or permission of the instructor.  Alternate years.

400
CORPORATE COMMUNICATION STRATEGY
An integrative course in issues management, crisis management, planning and evaluation, students learn organized and conscientious approaches for using communication to support business strategy, to manage reputation and to solve business problems. Prerequisites: CCOM 200, 210 and 324. Alternate years.

440
CAPSTONE RESEARCH PROJECT
Students about to enter careers in advertising, marketing communication, public relations or corporate communication go deep into one final single, semester-long, individual assignment of the student’s choice, with the instructor’s guidance and permission. Most often the assignment takes the form of a thesis of original research using literature reviews and qualitative or quantitative methods. Prerequisites: CCOM 200 and 324.  Alternate years.

470
INTERNSHIP
Interns usually work off-campus in fields related to their areas of study. Students must apply for departmental and College approval prior to registration to be eligible for this course. One to eight credits. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

146, 246, 346 and 446
CORPORATE COMMUNICATION COLLOQUIUM 
Students are required to complete successfully the non-credit Colloquium for a total of four semesters through academic experiences such as WRLC, The Lycourier and Crossing The Frame Productions. Enrollment in other similar on and off-campus academic experiences will be accepted with departmental approval. Non-credit and Pass/Fail.

DIGITAL MEDIA COMMUNICATION (DCOM)

Digital Media Communication is an innovative, interdisciplinary major with a strong relationship to other disciplines at the college including art, theater, creative writing, electronic music, business, sociology, political science and history. The boundaries between video, film, multi-media production, web design, digital sound, photography, graphic design and performance are collapsing as quickly as digital technology is expanding. The Digital Media curriculum at Lycoming College is grounded in the tradition of liberal arts and teaches the theory, skills and grammar of the visual language necessary to work within this rapidly changing technology. Upper-level studio and theory courses and the opportunity to do a professional internship provide the conceptual, technical and theoretical knowledge necessary to create compelling digital media and compete in the field.

All students majoring in Digital Media Communication must complete the core courses and at least one of the two concentrations listed below:

 

CORE COURSES:
ART 212  Color and Design
ART 227  Photography 1
BUS 228 Marketing Principles
CCOM 200 Introduction to Corporate Communication
DCOM 200  Digital Film and Video Production I
DCOM 300  Digital Film and Video Production II
DCOM 400  Digital Film and Video III/Senior Project
Either MWTG 219 Convergent Social Media or MWTG 325 Web Communication
THEA 114  Film Art: Motion Picture Masterpieces
Participation in the Senior Film and Video festival is required.

DIGITAL MEDIA COMMUNICATION COLLOQUIUM
DCOM 148, 248, 348, 448 (Non-credit and Pass/Fail)

CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS:

Visual Media:
ART 343; ART 344 or 430; ART 320/DCOM322 or ART 347; and one of the following three classes, ART 431, DCOM 320, or DCOM 330.  ART 343 is recommended but not required

Digital Filmmaking: 
DCOM 320 or 330; FILM 221; FILM 214 or 220; any one FILM course numbered 300 or higher. Art 343 is recommended but not required.

100
INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL MEDIA
Through a combination of lectures, screenings, and hands-on demonstrations, this course is an introduction to the history and methodology behind the digital processes of a broad range of visual media as it is used in advertising, filmmaking, digital video, and photography. Not open to students who have received credit for DCOM 200; does not count toward the DCOM major.

200
DIGITAL FILM and VIDEO PRODUCTION I
This course introduces students to the basics of digital image making as it applies to the moving image. Topics include the principles, techniques, and fundamentals of digital photography and digital video. 

300
DIGITAL FILM and VIDEO PRODUCTION II
This course is a continuation of the skills developed in DCOM 200, including film and video project research, title sequences and storyboards. Students are introduced to digital image manipulation and motion graphics as they apply to film and video. Prerequisite: DCOM 200 or consent of instructor. ART 343 is strongly recommended but not required. 

310
THE MOVING IMAGE IN SERIES
This production course prepares students to work with the moving image as a series of video shorts that stem from one concept or idea. The course is strongly encouraged for the DCOM major; it aids in preparation for the senior project. Pre-requisite: DCOM 300 or consent of the instructor.

320
NARRATIVE FILMMAKING
This course is an introduction to fiction filmmaking through lecture, screenings and hands-on demonstrations. Principles of cinematography, technical processes and continuity editing are covered. Students also discuss storytelling techniques and analyze the techniques used by established filmmakers. Alternate years. Prerequisite: DCOM 300 and FILM 221 or consent of the instructor.

330
DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING
Through a combination of lecture, screening and hands-on demonstrations, this course familiarizes students with planning, writing, developing and shooting non-fiction films. Students also discuss storytelling techniques and analyze the techniques used by established filmmakers. Alternate years. Prerequisite: DCOM 300.

322
VISUAL MEDIA IN THE DIGITAL AGE
The historical study of new media, with emphasis on video and interactive art forms, in relationship to the development of television, the World Wide Web and social networks. Cross-listed as ART 320. Alternate years. 

400
DIGITAL FILM and VIDEO III/ SENIOR PROJECT
Advanced production of documentary, narrative, or experimental video, multi-media or interactive media incorporating advanced directing, shooting, lighting, sound, effects and editing. This course is the capstone course for the Digital Media Communication major. Prerequisite: DCOM 300 and senior status, or consent of instructor.

148, 248, 348, 448
DIGITAL MEDIA COMMUNICATION COLLOQUIUM
Required every semester after the major is declared. Students are required to complete successfully the Colloquium through academic experiences such as WRLC and Crossing the Frame Productions. Enrollment in other similar academic experiences on or off campus can be accepted with departmental approval. Non-credit, Pass/Fail.

MINORS

CORPORATE COMMUNICATION  

The Corporate Communication minor will enhance the content of any major area of study with an additional set of marketable skills in communication and public relations for business, non-profits and political, policy or public interest groups. Five courses are required: CCOM 200, CCOM 210, two other four-credit CCOM courses, and one from ACCT 110, BUS 244 or PSCI 220.

DIGITAL MEDIA COMMUNICATION  

The Digital Media Communication minor will be of interest to students who want to learn digital media as a form to communicate the content of their majors. Students of various majors might want to create a documentary video or educational website on the subject of their senior research. Minors in Digital Media Communication may pursue graduate studies and/or employment in a variety of fields including digital media production, advertising, cultural analysis and documentary video production. Six courses are required: ART 227, 343, DCOM 200, 300, FILM 214, and one of the following three courses, ART 344, DCOM  320 or 330.

FILM STUDIES (FILM)

The Film Studies program develops skills in media writing and the critical analysis of film, television, and video as an art form. All minors develop skills in researching film history and thinking creatively about contemporary attitudes, values, and beliefs associated with film. Minors in Film Studies have the ability to pursue graduate studies and/or employment in a variety of fields including digital media production and administration, creative advertising, arts administration, journalism, cultural analysis, film preservation and writing for the media. Six courses are required. Required Foundation Courses: THEA 212 and FILM 326. Film History and Culture: two from FILM 220, 320, and THEA 114. Film Theory and Practice: two from FILM 221, 300, and 315.

214
SURVEY OF LANDMARKS IN FILM HISTORY
Close reading of selected films from around the world in an historical context using basic film theory to guide the reading with a major emphasis on cinematography, editing and mise-en-scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107.

220
TOPICS IN GENRES, ACTORS, AND DIRECTORS
Comparative study of film genres, directors, and/or performers from an historical perspective. May be repeated with change in content. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107.

221
INTRODUCTION TO SCREENWRITING
Training in methods of creating the original screenplay for film and/or television. Major emphasis is placed on scene and plot construction, character development and using the language of film to tell a story. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107.

300
FILM AND SOCIAL CHANGE
Close analysis of selected documentary, propaganda and social problem films that seek to influence our perceptions of reality. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107.

315
CREATIVITY IN FILM
Study of ground-breaking artists who developed new ways of relating form to content in independent, experimental, animated and digital films. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107.

320
TOPICS IN FILM AND CULTURE
Exploration of film and related media texts in a particular historical context.  A study of the art, music, literature, political and social framework of the period and culture under consideration is included. May be repeated with change in content. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107.

326
MEDIA CRITICISM
Practice of analyzing print, auditory, visual and digital texts from a cultural studies point of view. Major emphasis is placed on basic methods of semiotic theory and application of structuralist analysis and frame theory. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or 107 and sophomore standing.

MEDIA WRITING (MWTG) 

The minor in Media Writing provides students in any academic discipline with significant practice in writing to diverse audiences. Students completing this minor learn how to connect messages with audience needs, values and interests and how to make choices among the possible ways of conveying information in a mediated world.

Each student minoring in Media Writing completes five of the courses listed below as well as a minimum of two non-credit colloquium courses involved with campus media (one of which must include a full semester’s work on the campus newspaper). Writing, Rhetoric and Audiences: one from ENGL 218 and FILM 326. Applied Media Writing: three from ENGL 217, 240, FILM 300, MWTG 219, 324, 325. Special Areas of Media Writing: one from ART 430, ENGL 322, and FILM 221. Colloquium: two from CCOM 246, 346, and 446.

219
CONVERGENT SOCIAL MEDIA
Practical experience in news gathering for print, electronic and digital media by learning how to create share-worthy content. In this course students will learn how to write, photograph, broadcast, podcast and live-stream, with an emphasis on social media applications and the latest technology. Emphasis is on researching, and structuring stories for different kinds of media. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107.  

324
DIGITAL PUBLISHING
From desktop publishing for print newspapers, journals, newsletters and brochures, to ePublishing, to web and mobile publishing, today’s communication specialists are expected to know how to write effectively for various media. This course covers various publishing software and how to format content for various media applications and how to write feature articles for digital publishing. Prerequisite: ENG 106 or 107.

325
WEB COMMUNICATION 
This course introduces students to the complicated evolution of the Internet and how to effectively communicate and design for various media. Students learn how to use Search engines, and create wikis and content management systems. Prerequisite: ENG 106 or 107.