English (ENGL)

Professors: Feinstein, Hawkes, Lewes, Moses
Associate Professors: Hafer, Leiter (Chairperson), Preston
Assistant Professor: Hebert-Leiter
Part-time Instructor: Wheeler

The department offers two programs leading to the major in English:

Track I English - Major in Literature

This track is designed for students who choose English as a liberal arts major that prepares them for a wide range of career options; for students who choose English as their subject area for early childhood certification or who wish to earn secondary certification in English; for students who wish to improve their verbal and analytic ability in preparation for a specific career, such as technical writing, business or law; and for students who intend to pursue graduate study in British or American literature.

A minimum of ten courses is required for Track I. Required courses are ENGL 217, 220, 221; two courses selected from 222, 223 and 229; two from 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 331, 332, 333 and 334; one from 335 and 336; two electives beyond composition; and the Capstone Experience.

Students who wish to earn secondary teacher certification must complete a minimum of twelve courses in English. Required courses are ENGL 217, 220, 221, 335, 336, 338; two courses from 222, 223, 229; three courses from 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 331, 332, 333 and 334; one elective beyond composition; and the Capstone Experience.

Students who intend to pursue graduate study in British or American literature should complete the twelve English courses specified for secondary certification and, as part of that sequence, take ENGL 449, Advanced Criticism, as their English elective.

Track II English - Major in Creative Writing

This track is designed for students who aspire to careers as professional writers, as editors, and as publishers; for students who plan to continue studies in an M.F.A. or M.A. program; or for students who would like to discover their creative potential while pursuing a fundamental liberal arts education.

A minimum of ten courses is required for Track II. Required courses are ENGL 240; two courses selected from 220, 221, 222, 223, 225 and 229; two from 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 333 and 334; one from 331 and 332; one from 335 and 336; two from 341, 342, 441 and 442 (note prerequisites); and one from 411 or 412.

Students who wish to earn secondary teacher certification must complete a minimum of twelve courses in English. Required courses are ENGL 220, 240, 335, 336, 338; one course selected from 221, 222, 223, 225 and 229; two from 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 333, and 334; one from 331 and 332; two from 341, 342, 441, 442 (note prerequisites); and one from 411 and 412; ENGL 217 recommended.

The following courses satisfy the cultural diversity requirement: ENGL 229, 332, and 334. The following courses, when scheduled as W courses, count toward the writing intensive requirement: ENGL 218, 225, 229, 331, 334, 335, 336 and 338.

Capstone Experience

Seniors in the literature track must hand in a portfolio of writing during the first week of their final semester. The portfolio must include four major papers from English courses and a self-assessment essay. Seniors in the creative writing track must successfully complete either ENGL 411 or ENGL 412.

Minors

The department offers two minors in English:

Literature: Five courses in literature at the 200 level or above, at least three of which must be numbered 300 or above.
Writing: Five courses, four of which are chosen from ENGL 217, 218, 240, 322 and 338; plus one writing intensive course in literature at the 300 level.

106
COMPOSITION
Extensive practice in analytical writing. Special emphasis on developing the composing skills needed to articulate and defend a position in various situations requiring the use of written English. Credit may not be earned for both 106 and 107.

107
HONORS COMPOSITION
Extensive practice in analytical writing. Special emphasis on developing the writing skills of students who have the potential to benefit from advanced work. Placement by examination only. Credit may not be earned for both 106 and 107.

215
SELECTED TOPICS IN LITERATURE
An introduction to a variety of literature united by topic, which varies according to each instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

216
SELECTED TOPICS IN LITERATURE
An introduction to a variety of literature united by topic, which vary according to each instructor. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of the instructor.

217
CRITICAL WRITING SEMINAR
An introduction to writing critically about literary texts. Workshop setting offers intensive practice in the writing and critiquing of papers. Designed for beginning students of literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Not open to juniors or seniors except for newly declared majors or with consent of instructor.

218
CLASSICAL AND MODERN RHETORIC
An exploration of the province, content, strategies, and techniques comprising ancient and modern discourse, with particular emphasis on written lines of argument. This course may fulfill a humanities course distribution requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. 

219
HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
A study of the origins and development of the English language. It examines how linguistic change and historical forces have shaped our common tongue, using representative readings in Old, Middle, Early Modern, and Present Day English. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of the instructor. Alternate years.

220
BRITISH LITERATURE I
A survey of literary forms, dominant ideas, and major authors from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 18th century. The course includes a brief study of language development to Chaucer and emphasizes writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, Pope and Johnson. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of the instructor.

221
BRITISH LITERATURE II
Literary movements and authors from the beginnings of Romanticism to the end of the 19th century. Particular emphasis on such writers as Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Carlyle, Arnold, Hardy and Yeats. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor.

222
AMERICAN LITERATURE I
Survey of American literature from the beginning to 1865, with major emphasis on the writers of the Romantic period: Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Dickinson and Whitman. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor.

223
AMERICAN LITERATURE II
Survey of American literature from 1865 to 1945, emphasizing such authors as Twain, James, Crane, Hemingway, Faulkner, Frost, Eliot, Stevens, O’Neill and Williams. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor.

225
CLASSICAL LITERATURE
A study, in translation, of Greek and Roman works that have influenced Western writers. Literary forms studied include epic, drama, satire, and love poetry. Writers studied include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Virgil, Juvenal, Horace, Lucretius and Ovid. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor.

229
AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE
A survey of major works and authors of African American literary history from slavery to the present, focusing on such authors as Douglass, J. W. Johnson, Hurston, Hughes, Wright, Ellison and Morrison. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of the instructor.

240
INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
The gateway course for students intending to major in the Creative Writing track. An appropriate course for distribution if the student has demonstrated proficiency in writing. Workshop discussions, structured exercises, and readings in literature provide practice and instruction in the writing and evaluation of poetry and fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of the instructor.

311
MEDIEVAL LITERATURE
Readings in Old and Middle English poetry and prose from Bede’s Ecclesiastical History to Malory’s Arthurian romance. Study of lyric, narrative, drama and romance with emphasis on the cultural context from which these forms emerge. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

312
RENAISSANCE LITERATURE
An examination of themes and literary forms of the Renaissance. Authors studied  include Donne, Marlowe, More, Shakespeare, Sidney, Spenser and Surrey. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

313
RESTORATION AND 18TH-CENTURY LITERATURE
Consideration of selected themes, writers, or modes of Restoration and 18th-century literature (1660-1800) with emphasis on the social, political and intellectual life of that era. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

314
ROMANTIC LITERATURE
Concentrated study in the writers, texts and themes of the Romantic period (1789-1832) with emphasis on the social, political and intellectual life of that era. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

315
VICTORIAN LITERATURE
Concentrated study in the writers, texts and themes of the Victorian period (1832-1901) with emphasis on the social, political and intellectual life of that era. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

322

ADVANCED WRITING: THE CREATIVE ESSAY
A course in which students from all disciplines learn to explore and define themselves through the essay, a form used to express the universal through the particular and the personal. Readings include essayists from Montaigne to Gould. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

331
MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY FICTION
Examination of the novels and short fiction of such major writers as Conrad, Woolf, Joyce, Faulkner, Fowles and Nabokov, with special emphasis on the relationship of their works to concepts of modernism. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor.

332
MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY POETRY
Studies in the themes and visions of modern and contemporary poets, beginning with Yeats and the American Modernists, covering a variety of central movements (such as the Harlem Renaissance), and concluding with a range of multi-cultural authors. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107 or consent of instructor.

333
THE NOVEL
An examination primarily of British and American works from the 18th century to the present, focusing on the novel’s ability — since its explosive inception — to redefine its own boundaries. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

334
WOMEN AND LITERATURE
An examination — literary, social and historical — of literature by women representing diverse cultures. Each course examines a particular theme significant to women writers from more than one cultural background. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

335
CHAUCER
A study of representative work in the context of Chaucer’s life and times. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of the instructor. Alternate years.

336
SHAKESPEARE
A study of representative plays in the context of Shakespeare’s life and times. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

338
LINGUISTICS
An intensive look at the English language, focusing on three grammatical systems (traditional, structural, transformational) to identify their strengths and weaknesses. Attention is also given to larger issues, including language change, the politics of language, the creation of meaning, language acquisition and dialects. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

341
POETRY WORKSHOP I
An intermediate workshop focusing on the writing of poetry and methods of analysis. Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in ENGL 240, or consent of instructor.

342
FICTION WORKSHOP I
An intermediate course in the writing of short fiction in a workshop environment, where the student is trained to hear language at work. Emphasis on characterization and story. Prerequisite: Grade of B or better in ENGL 240, or consent of instructor.

411
FORM AND THEORY: POETRY
An advanced workshop in which students are asked to write in various poetic forms, such as the sonnet, villanelle, sestina and pantoum. Prerequisite: ENGL 341 or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

412
FORM AND THEORY: FICTION
A course that examines philosophical and aesthetic theories of fiction, and the resulting fiction based on those theories. Authors will most likely include Aristotle, Calvino, Gardner, Gass and Nabokov. Prerequisite: ENGL 342 or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

421
ADVANCED TOPICS IN LITERATURE
An upper-level literature course governed either by concept (such as a theme or movement) or author (one to three figures). Topics vary according to each instructor. Prerequisite: At least one English course numbered 218 and above, or consent of the instructor. Alternate years. May be taken a second time for credit with departmental approval.

441
POETRY WORKSHOP II
An advanced workshop in the writing of poetry. Students receive intensive analysis of their own work and acquire experience in evaluating the work of their peers. Prerequisite: ENGL 341.

442
FICTION WORKSHOP II
An advanced course in the writing of short fiction. Emphasis on the complexities of voice and tone. The student is encouraged to develop and control his or her individual style and produce publishable fiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 342.

449
ADVANCED CRITICISM
Reading and discussion in the theory and history of criticism. Examination of both traditional and contemporary ideas about the value and nature of literary expression and its place in human culture generally. Work in the course includes practical as well as theoretical use of the ideas and methods of critical inquiry. Prerequisite: ENGL 106 or 107, or consent of instructor. Alternate years.

470-479
INTERNSHIP (See index)
The department provides internships in editing, legal work, publishing and technical writing.

N80-N89
INDEPENDENT STUDY (See index)
Recent studies include the role of Pennsylvania in the fiction of John O’Hara; the changing image of women in American art and literature (1890-1945); the hard-boiled detective novel; contemporary women writers; and Milton’s use of the Bible in Paradise Lost.

490-491
INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR DEPARTMENTAL HONORS (See index)
Recent projects include “The Function of the Past in the Fiction of William Faulkner” and “Illusion, Order and Art in the Novels of Virginia Woolf.”