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THE CHRONICLE

 

Journal of the Historical Society

of the

Susquehanna Conference

of the

United Methodist Church

 

Milton W. Loyer

Editor

 

                                                                            

Volume XXII                                                                                             spring 2011

_________________________________________________________________________

Editor's Preface .......................................................................................................2

The Evangelical Church in Northeast Pennsylvania………………………...…… 3

compiled from the conference archives, 2011

The Methodist Protestant Church in Northeast Pennsylvania.…………………..12

The Final Fifteen……..……………………………………..…………….…………….13

by Milton Loyer, 2011

  A Resume and Decision on the Claim for Preachers Aid Funds…….……..….20

by Francis T. Tagg and George R. Brown, 1910

A Letter from the South Canaan MP Church…………………………….……………..24

by John F. Lennon, 1915

The Methodist Episcopal Church in Northeast Pennsylvania.……..………..…...26

The Wyoming Conference’s Pennsylvania Boundaries…………………..………..27

compiled from the conference archives, 2011

Elisha Butler…………………………………………………………….…………….....31

from the East Baltimore Conference records, 1859

Our Years in Northeast Pennsylvania………………………………………………..57

by Thelma Proof, 1970

Developing the Eastern Urban Areas………………………………….............…68

The Commencement of Methodism in Dauphin County………………...…..69

by Richard Nolen, 1873

  The Colonial Park Church…………………………………………………...85

by Bruce Souders, 1962

The Scranton Area’s Forgotten Methodist Churches…………………......…..91

compiled from the conference archives, 2011


EDITOR'S PREFACE

 

On behalf of the Historical Society of the Susquehanna Conference of the United Methodist Church, I present volume XXII of The Chronicle.  For over twenty years, the society has produced a mix of scholarly, entertaining, informative and inspiring stories of United Methodism – all united by a common theme.  This volume continues that tradition.

 

This year’s unifying theme "The Eastern Edge” welcomes our Pennsylvania brothers and sisters from the former Wyoming Conference to The Chronicle by presenting stories relating to the eastern edge of the Susquehanna Conference, including much material relating specifically to the former Wyoming Conference.  The articles are clustered into four sections.

 

The section titled “The Evangelical Church in Northeast Pennsylvania” summarizes the histories contained in the conference archives for the former Evangelical congregations known to have owned a church building within the Pennsylvania area of the Wyoming Conference.

 

The section titled “The Methodist Protestant Church in Northeast Pennsylvania” is a series of three articles concentrating on the 15 former Methodist Protestant congregations in northeast Pennsylvania that survived until the 1939 re-union of that denomination with its Methodist Episcopal relatives to form the Methodist Church.

 

The section titled “The Methodist Episcopal Church in Northeast Pennsylvania” is a series of three articles about that denomination’s trials and tribulations in that part of the state – the trials and tribulations of congregations on the boundary of the former Wyoming Conference, the trial (literally) of a Methodist Episcopal preacher in Luzerne County, and the trials (figuratively) of a young pastor’s wife beginning her parsonage life in Bradford and Susquehanna Counties.

 

This year’s volume of The Chronicle concludes with a section titled “Developing the Eastern Urban Areas” that is a series of three articles involving cities on the eastern edge of the conference – a first-hand account from 1873 of the Methodist beginnings in Dauphin County and Harrisburg, the story of the United Brethren efforts to minister in the Harrisburg suburbs in general and in Colonial Park in particular, and a look at some former Scranton area Methodist churches whose stories, through a variety of circumstances, were all but lost.

 

These articles represent a wide variety of perspectives.  They cover all the members of the United Methodist family: the Evangelical Association, the United Evangelical Church, the Methodist Episcopal Church, the Methodist Protestant Church, the Methodist Church (both the 1858-1877 version and the 1939-1968 version), and the United Brethren Church.  Some were written as early as 1859 and others as recently as this year. They were composed by pastors, laypeople, historians, and church dignitaries.  May they prove to be a blessing and an encouragement to each reader.